Declaration of the Kimberley Workshop on the Intangible Heritage of Monuments and Sites (2003)

Preface: The Declaration of the Kimberley Workshop on the Intangible Heritage of Monuments and Sites was adopted by the ICOMOS 14th General Assembly and Scientific Symposium, Victoria Falls, Zimbabwe, 27 – 31 Oct.

The General Assembly and Scientific Symposium was organised by ICOMOS South Africa, in conjunction with the McGregor Museum and the Northern Cape Provincial Department of Sports, Arts and Culture, this event was open to all ICOMOS members, and aimed at preparing a first draft for a declaration on the management of sites with intangible values for discussion at the General Assembly and possible future use as a doctrinal text of the organisation, it also hoped to develop a work programme for ICOMOS in this field.

The program was organised over a two-day period. After an introduction the first session opened with three short keynote addresses, followed by discussion and questions from the floor. The three papers were presented by Robyn Ridett (Australia), Simon Musonda (Zambia) and Dinu Bumbaru (Canada).The workshop was then divided into three groups, each of which looked at the three topics of the scientific symposium to be held in Zimbabwe in some detail.

Group 1

There are links between tangible and intangible heritage; they are not mutually exclusive concepts.

Group 2

It is important to understand that multiple associative values exist with many sites and therefore we need to set out paradigms as an overlay so as to include the values enshrined and represented in intangible heritage, viz.

  • Cultural practices around particular sites e.g. dance rituals, symbolic practices etc.
  • Fabric associated with meaning on the site.
  • Environmental aspects: noise, smell, and spirits/ghosts etc.
  • Evocative and experiential aspects: emotive, intellectual, physical and sensory.

Group 3

  • Intangible heritage gives meanings, values and contexts to objects and places. The individual elements cannot be separated. The tangible and intangible are always connected.
  • In terms of the International Convention (ICSICT) and the work of ICOMOS, intangible heritage provides the confirmation of the values of the place and its significance.
  • Place is always part of the culture and is embedded in it.
  • ICOMOS and the (ICSICT) have taken it for granted that intangible heritage is integral to tangible heritage.
  • The different conventions try to reach the same goal by different processes from a different starting position.
  • Indigenous heritage provides confirmation of heritage significance wherein the intangible is integral to the tangible heritage.
  • Extent of the boundary between place and its meaning – some cultural practices are connected to particular places, or are regional or national with no obvious boundaries. Criteria will need to be developed to assess the value of different intangible heritages.
  • Tradition: what is the meaning of tradition? Is it more connected with indigenous people rather than all people, as compared with the western concentration on meaning and monuments? All people have a tradition.

On the occasion of the Kimberley Workshop to which all national committees were invited, the role of intangible heritage in relation to the work of ICOMOS and the World Heritage Convention was discussed. At the workshop it was agreed to submit a resolution to the 14th meeting of the ICOMOS General Assembly at Victoria Falls, Zimbabwe, for the development of a charter on Intangible Heritage.

The resolution has been developed around the 3 subthemes of the 2003 Zimbabwe General Assembly.

  • The Intangible Dimensions – Concepts, Identification and Assembly
  • The Impact of change and diverse Perceptions
  • Conserving and Managing Intangible Heritage – Methodology
Category
Declaration
Date

2003

Promulgation

ICOMOS 14th General Assembly and Scientific Symposium, Victoria Falls, Zimbabwe, 27 – 31 Oct.

Descriptions

  • The declaration recognizes the indivisible nature of tangible and intangible heritage. Intangible Heritage gives meanings, values and context to objects and places.
  • It emphasizes the importantance to understand that there is a multiplicity of values that exist within any one site and that these relate to emotive, intellectual, physical and sensory experiences of the site. These values include those of symbolism, identity, culture, living traditions, remembrance and memories, the environment and nature.

Source

http://www.international.icomos.org/victoriafalls2003/kimberley.pdf

Download

http://orcp.hustoj.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/kimberley.pdf

References

Intellectual Property

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