A Preservation Charter for the Historic Towns and Areas of the USA (1992)

National Register of Historic Places. Historic preservation (US), heritage preservation or heritage conservation (UK), is an endeavour that seeks to preserve, conserve and protect buildings, objects, landscapes or other artifacts of historical significance. The term tends to refer specifically to the preservation of the built environment, and not to preservation of, for example, primeval forests or wilderness.

Preface: A Preservation Charter for the Historic Towns and Areas of the United States of America was adopted by the ICOMOS US, Virginia, 14 March, 1992.

This Charter represents the ICOMOS United States’ adaptation of the 1987 ICOMOS Historic Towns Charter. It defines four objectives for the preservation of historic towns in the U.S., emphasizing preservation as integral to community planning. It sees property owners and residents as playing a key role in the protection of historic towns, participating in the planning process. In 18 principles, the document outlines the components of a successful preservation program for historic towns, including studies of the history, culture, architecture and other appropriate fields in order to understand the historic context as well as considerations about the future of the area.

Other principles include:

  • a harmonious relationship between the historic area and it’s surrounding region,
  • thorough study and documentation prior to any changes,
  • involvement of residents in planning,
  • retaining sound, affordable housing and avoiding displacement of residents, and
  • respecting the scale and character of the surrounding built environment in new construction.
The document addresses such specific issues as the introduction and development of parking, roads and transit systems. It encourages protection of the historic area and its residents from natural disasters as far as possible. It also encourages educational efforts and specialized training to improve preservation efforts in historic areas. Finally, the Charter suggests the creation of preservation organizations and financial incentives that encourage preservation.
Category
Charter

Date

1992

Promulgation

ICOMOS US, Virginia, 14 March, 1992.

Descriptions

  • This Charter represents the ICOMOS United States’ adaptation of the 1987 ICOMOS Historic Towns Charter.
  • It defines four objectives for the preservation of historic towns in the U.S., emphasizing preservation as integral to community planning.
  • It sees property owners and residents as playing a key role in the protection of historic towns, participating in the planning process.
  • In 18 principles, it outlines the components of a successful preservation program for historic towns, including studies of the history, culture, architecture and other appropriate fields in order to understand the historic context as well as considerations about the future of the area.
  • It addresses such specific issues as the introduction and development of parking, roads and transit systems.
  • It encourages protection of the historic area and its residents from natural disasters as far as possible, and also encourages educational efforts and specialized training to improve preservation efforts in historic areas.
  • It suggests the creation of preservation organizations and financial incentives that encourage preservation.

Source

http://www.usicomos.org/symp/archive/1992/docs/4943

Download

 http://orcp.hustoj.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/1992-A-Preservation-Charter-for-the-Historic-Towns-and-Areas-of-the-United-States-of-America.pdf

References

Intellectual Property

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About Sunney 84 Articles

I received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in 1996, 2003, and 2006, respectively, from China University of Geosciences, Wuhan, China; Hefei University of Technology, Hefei, China; and Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, China. From 1996 to 2006, I worked at the School of Computer Science and Technology, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei, China, as a Lecturer and an Associate Professor. From January 2007 to August 2013, I worked at Wenzhou University, Wenzhou, China. I am currently a Professor at the Zhejiang University of Media and Communications, Hangzhou, China. I am the coauthor of more than 80 articles, which mostly were published in peer-reviewed journals.

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